Myth Busters: Fitness Edition

fitness-myth-vs-facts
David Modderman

Myth #1: The more you sweat, the more you burn

According to an article on Health.com says that sweating has nothing to do with how many calories you burn. “Sweat is a biological response that cools your skin and regulates internal body temperature,” Matthews says.  I always believed that sweating excessively was a sign of my hard work, but it turns out it doesn’t mean that.

Myth #2: Stretching helps your body recover faster

A recent study at the University of Milan on the effects of postworkout recovery methods found no significant changes in blood lactate levels (a measure of how fatigued your muscles are) in folks who stretch after exercise. While stretching may not completely reduce muscle soreness or speed muscle tissue repair, limbering up still has certain benefits, Westcott says: Doing it right after a workout, when the body is still warm, is the best way to increase joint flexibility.

Myth #3: You shouldn’t work out on an empty stomach

Many people think that working out without having food in your stomach isn’t good for your body. According to Women’s Health Magazine, you burn more fat at the gym before you eat breakfast. However, it is important to remember to keep drinking water while you work out.

Myth #4: NO PAIN, NO GAIN

Anybody who has worked out has heard the saying “no pain, no gain” however, that is a dangerous saying. It is normal to feel some discomfort while working out or lifting weights, but if you feel sharp pain anywhere, you need to stop immediately and consult your doctor. Pushing your body through extreme pain while working out may result in serious injury.

Myth #5: If you aren’t sore, your workout was too easy

According to an article on bodybuilding.com soreness is inflammation and the chemical response to inflammation. The only yardstick by which you need to measure progress is that of your goal. There are Olympic athletes who haven’t felt soreness in years.  Judging your progress by a pain threshold is incorrect—you don’t have to have soreness to gain muscle size or strength.

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